Posts tagged fast friends
Meet Megan Babineau

"Is a women's only event a mistake?" "I don't know any women who would go to something like this on their own."  These are just a few comments I heard as I was launching Over And Out, but 73 women showed up to our first event, and each girl's story about why they came was unique and inspiring in it's own way. 

We continue spotlighting some of the rad girls who came to the first Over And Out, to show exactly how they made their journey happen, and to show that heeelllll-no a women's-only event isn't a mistake; it's a life-changing experience and a damn good time!  

Photo by Megan Maloy

Photo by Megan Maloy

MEET MEGAN BABINEAU  @alluneedisluff

HOW DID YOU FIND OUT ABOUT OVER AND OUT?

I am lucky enough to have a partner that works and is active in the motorcycle industry. He follows Kelly (the girl that runs the event) on social media, read about the event in one of her posts and mentioned it to me. He thought it would be a rad thing for me to attend, he was rather persistent as the weeks went on! He knew an all-female event would help me gain confidence in my riding. 

Photo by Megan Maloy

Photo by Megan Maloy

SO, YOU FINALLY CAME AROUND!  WHAT MADE YOU WANT TO ATTEND?

Many things! 

First, I did want to ride with other women. While I knew we wouldn’t all be the same level, the fact that we are all women would make a big difference alone.I felt that surrounding myself with gnarly women who are just as good, if not better, than men at riding would help me get over feeling sidelined in a male dominant sport.

I’m also always down for an outdoor adventure and wanted to push myself to attend a riding event without the men I usually ride with. It’s truly a personal accomplishment being able to say I traveled 4 hours away into the woods, on my own, not knowing anyone there.

Photo by Sarah Van Tassel

Photo by Sarah Van Tassel

DID YOU ALREADY HAVE OFF-ROAD RIDING EXPERIENCE? 

I did. Besides taking the motorcycle course I actually only have off road experience. I ride in a handful of North-Central Pennsylvania locations. 

WERE YOU WORRIED ABOUT ANYTHING PRIOR TO ATTENDING?

The “what if’s” were endless!  I own a Yamaha TTR-125 that I am very comfortable riding.. I wasn’t trying to be anything I wasn’t or ride a bike I couldn’t handle but I was nervous about showing up on what might be thought of as a beginner bike. Socially, I thought it might be cliquey and worried people would be judgmental.

Then there was the travel and transporting my bike! I am certainly not helpless, but I don’t usually load or unload my bike on my own. I always have the assistance of the guys I ride with.  For OAO, I loaded my TTR, had to FaceTime someone and Google to figure out how ratchet straps worked (because I wasn’t listening when I was told how)

Then there was unloading the bike once I arrived. Dreadful!  But, not anymore. I’m the one that loads the bikes now. ;)

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HOW WAS EVERYTHING ONCE YOU ARRIVED?

It was insanely easy. I’m foolish for psyching myself out prior to the event. People are friendly. It’s not high school. I drove right in and introduced myself to a few people. They introduced themselves like kind human beings do, and helped me unload my bike. 

After that, another woman pulled up and we helped her unload her bike too. All four of us were at completely different riding levels, but as the event went on, we rode together, rode with others, stopped and took breaks together, ate lunch together, roasted marshmallows and BAM! Two of us are planning a riding date together for September.

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WHAT TYPE OF RIDING DID YOU DO AT OVER AND OUT? 

I am most comfortable in the woods, so I started out on the beginner woods loop.  After a couple loops I hopped on over to the grass tracks with some ladies I met and we gave those a whirl. 

Once we got more comfortable, we went on to the intermediate woods loop. It was incredible terrain. The property was amazing and plenty was offered.

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DID YOU LEARN OR EXPERIENCE ANYTHING NEW?

It rained all weekend so that in itself taught me plenty about riding in the rain.... It’s cold and wet and slippery and WET. You can easily get inside your head after wiping out half a dozen times within the first hour, so it taught me a lot about keeping myself together mentally.  Mother Nature can be tough, but learning to move with what she gives you is pretty rad. 

Photo by Megan Maloy

Photo by Megan Maloy

I realized that I can go faster than I think, after following someone in the grass and watching her movements. She was gnarly in the grass and I had some speed on her in the woods so we bounced ideas off one another and laughed and joked while slipping in the mud. The sensation of doing something as fun as riding bikes with another female that loves it as much as I do was something completely new...and very cool!

Photo by Sarah Van Tassel

Photo by Sarah Van Tassel

WHAT WOULD YOU TELL ANOTHER GIRL WHO MIGHT BE THINKING OF JOINING IN? 

GET OUT THERE! The motorcycle community is a very welcoming and warm one.

For 3 years I saw how much fun my hubby and his friends had when they all got together and rode bikes. 2 years ago he gifted me my Yamaha TTR-125 and now I know what the hype is all about. 

I drove home from Over And Out and the very next day I rode on the street for the first time on his Yamaha WR250R.

Photo by Megan Maloy

Photo by Megan Maloy

I have dreams of riding cross country, entering races (which she has since then!) and expanding my mechanical bike knowledge all because of the unexplainable experience I had at OAO. My interest in bikes didn’t come from OAO, but my understanding and love of the sport grew substantially. 

I can’t say attending this event by myself is something I never would have done, but events like this, exclusively for women, don’t happen very often. Rather than hear about the cool stuff other people do, be the person doing cool stuff! 

Meet Meghan Milligan, Coordinator for Over And Out
Photo by Sarah Van Tassel

Photo by Sarah Van Tassel

Meghan Milligan - Pittsburgh, PA - @meggymilly

KTM 200xcw

HOW DID YOU GET INTO OFF-ROAD RIDING?

My fiancé Adam was the one who got me into riding off-road. When I first started riding in 2014, I only wanted to ride street and never have thought that I would get into riding dirt. Now if I ever had to choose between the two, street or dirt, I would choose to ride off-road, hands down! I would always watch videos of Adam ripping through trails and was completely mesmerized — I wanted to experience that same adrenaline feeling. 

I first learned how to ride dirt on my 1992 Suzuki DR350. It was a great bike to start out on, but once I got a taste of a 2-stroke dirt bike that was it — I needed something more compatible for the riding style I craved.

Photo by Adam Frye

Photo by Adam Frye

Adam then surprised me for Christmas one year with a 1996 Kawasaki KX125. That's the bike that made me completely fall in love with riding 2-strokes. The power completely changed my outlook on riding off-road and I couldn't stop smiling underneath my helmet.

However, my KX was at times challenging to ride due to some minor imperfections. I wanted to desperately advance in my skill set so instead of putting tons of money to fix up an old bike I decided to sell it to RIDE ORANGE!  I am now the proud owner of a 2009 KTM 200 XC-W and couldn't be more pumped! It's an incredible bike to ride trails and help me grow as a rider. 

Photo by Adam Frye

Photo by Adam Frye

WHAT KIND OF TERRAIN DO YOU LIKE RIDING THE MOST? 

There is nothing more thrilling than riding through the woods trying to get through each obstacle that comes your way. You get to ride through nature's very own playground — log crossings, rocky terrain, ruts — the list goes on. What really keeps it exciting that you can ride a route one weekend and by the next one it can change completely! Riding trails really improves your technical skill set — especially when riding tight single-track. And let's be real, it doesn't hurt that you're surrounded by the amazing scenery of the woods. 

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WHAT'S YOUR FAVORITE THING ABOUT RIDING? 

I love that you are constantly challenging yourself off-road. There is always something new to learn and you’re continuously working on improving your skills.  It's an incredible feeling when you are able to get through an obstacle that you once struggled with.

WHAT IS YOUR INVOLVEMENT WITH OVER AND OUT? 

The first I heard about Over And Out was when Kelly mentioned to me that she wanted to create a ladies-only off-road event here on the East Coast. There was no event like that on our side of the country and Kelly was determined to make it happen! While she worked on plans for a public event, she organized a smaller trial event with a handful of women (of all levels) and women loved it. After that I was ECSTATIC to hear the official plans for Over And Out were a GO, and that we were finally getting a women's off-road event here on the East Coast!!  

Photo by Adam Frye

Photo by Adam Frye

As far as my involvement with Over And Out, I'm helping to bring in great items for the raffle, am assisting with event set-up and...pretty much whatever else is needed to produce an event like this! It's really fun to coordinate all of the exciting things to come! 

WHY IS THIS EVENT IMPORTANT TO YOU?

I feel honored to help assist Kelly in the planning of OAO — it's great to have an incredible woman in the off-roading community be the brains behind this event, but even better to help a friend that I have connected with through the love of riding dirt bikes! We met at the first Babes Ride Out East Coast and I was pumped to meet a woman who loves riding trails like me! 

When Kelly first told me that she was planning Over And Out I immediately volunteered to help in any way I could! I always wished there was a dirt bike/off-road event out here for women and I couldn't be happier that it is now a reality.

Riding dirt bikes has become such a huge part of my life so being able to help with Over And Out is very important to me. I can't wait to meet more great people, and I can't wait to RIDE!

Photo by Sarah Van Tassel

Photo by Sarah Van Tassel

Meet Lauren Leal

Lauren's a pint-size powerhouse who can handle a Harley Dyna Street Bob (103 cubic inches - 1688cc), but discovered (the hard way) that the best bike for her in the woods is a 140cc trail bike.  Meet our newest #fastfriend, Lauren Leal.

Photo by Kelly McCaughey

Photo by Kelly McCaughey

Lauren Leal, Kawasaki KLX 140L - @electricleal

Interview by Ashley Lusky.

HOW DID YOU GET STARTED RIDING DIRT BIKES?

I’ve been riding dirt bikes for three years now. I actually started riding in the woods to improve my street riding skills. Five years ago I took the state’s motorcycle course to get my motorcycle license but I didn’t do much riding after that because I was really afraid to get on the road with other vehicles. My boyfriend convinced me to get into the woods so that I could improve my riding skills overall, and it did help me get more comfortable riding on the street. 

Photo by Kelly McCaughey

Photo by Kelly McCaughey

WHAT WAS ONE OF THE INITIAL CHALLENGES YOU HAD TO OVERCOME?

It can be really hard for people to get into the woods in the northeast, especially in states like New Jersey where there aren’t many places to legally ride off-road. Getting seat time is the only way to improve your riding, but it’s not like you can just rip through local hiking trails! So finding new places to ride is definitely a challenge, but the more people I meet who ride the more chances I get!

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WHAT BIKE DID YOU BEGIN RIDING IN THE WOODS WITH?

I had a Honda CRF 250L at first, and it was a tough start for sure because I was definitely on the wrong bike for my size and for the type of riding I was doing. It was too tall. Even after lowering it, I still had trouble touching the ground; and, it was also extremely heavy – heavier than my boyfriend’s WR 450!

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I actually broke my leg on this bike, and when that happened I couldn't even lift it off myself. Needless to say starting out this way didn't do much for my confidence.

Photo by Lauren Leal

Photo by Lauren Leal

Photo by Lauren Leal

Photo by Lauren Leal

AFTER YOU BROKE YOUR LEG, HOW DID YOU GET BACK "ON THE HORSE"? 

It was scary at first because I was constantly thinking about protecting that leg. I just had to get out there and do it. My body healed pretty quickly, so it was just a matter of getting my mind to recover too. Getting a bike more well suited for me also helped.

Photo by Kelly McCaughey

Photo by Kelly McCaughey

WHAT DO YOU RIDE NOW?

I bought a KLX 140L this past fall and am already in love! It’s not quite a full-size bike, which is perfect for me at 5’4”. I am able to do so much more with this bike because I can actually touch my feet down and I can pick it up if I fall. It has the perfect amount of power for the trail riding that I am doing and I am actually able to pick up more speed because I’m working with less weight and I don’t have that lingering fear of “what do I do if I fall”. It's made a huge difference to how I feel about riding, I am so pumped about it.

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WHAT WOULD YOU RECOMMEND TO A NEW RIDER WHO'S THINKING OF BUYING A BIKE?

Buying a bike is a significant purchase, so you want to make sure you get it right. I highly recommend trying out as many different bikes as possible. Since most shops won’t let you test ride dirt bikes the way they do with street bikes, you really have to take advantage of opportunities within your personal network. I’ve found that most people are willing to let you try out their bikes – I mean, they’re dirt bikes, they’re meant to get dirty!

Photo by Kelly McCaughey

Photo by Kelly McCaughey

I went to Over And Out’s kickoff event this past fall and it was one of the best examples of just how open the dirt bike community can be. All of the ladies there were willing to share whatever they had – pads, gloves, goggles, and of course bikes! I brought a Honda XR 200 all the way from New Jersey and it wasn’t kicking over. That could’ve been a huge waste of a weekend for me but it wasn’t because others were willing to share their bikes. It ended up being an awesome experience – probably better than if my bike was working – because I got into the woods on three different bikes.

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WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING FORWARD TO MOST ABOUT OAO'S FIRST PUBLIC EVENT?

Besides making smores? Just kidding. I am super excited to meet more women who are enthusiastic about getting in the woods. I’ve met a handful of great female street riders, but not as many woods riders. I don’t ride in the woods by myself – if you do, you shouldn’t… That’s just crazy! I'm excited about Over And Out because I'd love to meet more girls who ride, but also just to have another chance to ride with the few I DO know. ...and to check out these awesome trails up in Hancock!

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO A WOMAN WHO IS INTERESTED IN RIDING DIRT BIKES BUT HASN'T TAKEN THE LEAP?

Get up and go! If you know someone who rides dirt bikes, ask them if they will bring you along. There is already a ladies riding community and it’s growing so I think it’s just going to open more doors for women who are excited about woods riding.

Meet Kelly McCaughey

It's weird as hell publishing an interview of yourself, but I had the pleasure of being interviewed by fellow rider Amelia Kamrad about Over And Out so you could learn a little more about me and the Over And Out event! 

Yes, I'm the girl behind the keyboard most of the time, but Over And Out isn't just me, and it isn't about me. There are many people, men and women, working behind the scenes to make this event a reality. And it's really about you, the girl rider, and giving you another opportunity to get out there and ride!  -K

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Kelly McCaughey @kellymccaughey

WHAT IS YOUR INVOLVEMENT WITH OVER AND OUT?

Well, I created Over And Out! :)  I wanted to create a way for more girls to experience riding off-road but also get to see and learn the difference between a variety of terrain and riding styles.

Here in the Northeast, public recreational riding area is nearly non-existent. At the same time woods riding and enduro races are huge in this part of the country. There’s a gap between people who would like to learn or experience more off-road riding and those who have access to land or feel skilled enough to join in a race. 

Community is key to bridging this gap.  While I’m the main driving force behind Over And Out, there are many others involved, all working together to make this a unique and fun opportunity for female riders in the Northeast.

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

WHY MAKE THE EVENT JUST FOR WOMEN?

That part happened kind of organically. I’ve always ridden with men, and there’s nothing wrong with that. But over the past few years more girls have become interested in riding dirt, and some girls I knew started asking me where they could try riding. So, I had a small group of girls who’d never ridden dirt bikes come over to my house to give it a try.

Well, as much as I love riding, I found just as much joy in watching them ride dirt for the first time: Teaching them a few basics, watching them bobble off to a start, watching some of them take to it like complete naturals! One girl said “I can’t stop smiling inside my helmet!” and I’ll never forget that!

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

Shortly after that, I rode an event upstate and another girl found me on Instagram through the hashtag! She had some trails and wanted to ride with other girls too. So I started putting the feelers out through Instagram to coordinate a women’s riding weekend - which Is how I met you!  (talking to interviewer Millie Kamrad ;) 

SO THAT WAS PART OF PLANNING FOR THIS EVENT?

Pretty much! I already had some plans in the works for a public event, but this was a great way to further connect with other female riders, and meeting these women was an awesome experience. 

I could go on and on about that weekend, but what I loved most about it is that those girls were there because of one fact: they wanted to ride, and they made it happen. Some of them heard about it through the grapevine and contacted me. Some borrowed bikes and trucks; some carpooled with others they barely knew. They were presented with the opportunity and they made it happen.

Photo by Kelly McCaughey

Photo by Kelly McCaughey

To see it all come together was very cool. Everyone was easy going, positive and friendly. And in the morning we got suited, booted and started up our engines together.  And since then, girls from that group have connected individually to go riding together, so by meeting each other it created even more opportunities for some of them to ride.  

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OK, SO TELL US ABOUT OVER AND OUT!

To make a public event possible, Over And Out has partnered with the Bear Creek Sportsmen riding club of Hancock, NY.  The club owns private property in the town of Hancock and holds just a couple of public riding events each year. Over And Out will be their first ladies-only riding event!

Over And Out is a two-pronged event: It’s for dirt, woods and trail bikes that can ride over the mountain on marked trails, as well as street-legal dual sport and adventure bikes that can ride out on mapped dirt routes that we will provide.

Photo by Kelly McCaughey

Photo by Kelly McCaughey

There are many different styles of off-road riding and bikes: dirt, woods and trail bikes, dual sport and adventure bikes. This event seeks to include almost all of them, and all levels of rider. The only type of riding we’re not catering to this year is motocross.

This event is not a race or a hare scramble, it's a casual friendly riding event with options for everyone, from nervous beginners to long-distance adventurers to serious woods rippers!

Photo by Amy Batog

Photo by Amy Batog

WHAT CAN RIDERS EXPECT AS FAR AS TERRAIN GOES?

There’s going to be something for everyone. There are miles of grass tracks and fields to ride.  There will also be a variety of marked woods loops ranging from beginner to intermediate to super gnarly! We will also be doing a guided ride on Saturday for advanced riders.

For riders who have dual sports (on-road/off-road) and adventure bikes, we’ll be providing mapped routes that explore a variety of dirt roads and terrain throughout the area.

I’ll be sharing more specifics about the property, the terrain options and bike details through the blog and website in the coming months.

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

WHAT ABOUT THE REST OF THE EVENT, WHAT CAN ATTENDEES EXPECT?

The event will be focused on riding and having fun, plain and simple. I think the atmosphere is going to be great. It’ll be laid back, very low pressure, but also offer challenges and new experiences. 

I've met some of the greatest people through riding, and I expect that I'll meet many more at Over And Out. My partners at Bear Creek Sportsmen are also fantastic, so we'll all have a really good time. 

There is SO much for me to share in the coming months I can’t even begin to tap into it all here. Stay tuned for details in the coming months!

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOU, THE RIDER.

I always tell this story because I think it says it all, but the first time I ever rode was when my husband (then boyfriend) took me to his friend’s house to learn. They all grew up riding and racing, and he had an XR100 - perfect for me to learn on. 

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

As far as basic riding goes I took to it naturally. I got right on and cruised around.  They got bored watching me go around a field in circles and decided to take me on a woods trail.  That part was just amazing. It's like my brain lit up in all these new ways. I struggled, sure, but I loved it. I literally thought to myself “This is what I want to get good at.”

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

Fast forward 5-6 years and I still love riding. I've gotten to experience some really hard terrain, and I immediately fell in love with the feeling of exploring out in nature, and the feeling of making progress as a rider. Riding isn't easy. Some days are freezing, some are sweltering hot. I've hurt myself or had bad days, but not once I have even thought about quitting. I just love riding. So let's riiiiide!

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

Photo by Dan Sternaimolo

@overandoutmoto   @kellymccaughey  

Interview by Amelia Kamrad @millieonthemove

Meet Erika Hurst

The female off-road riding community has no shortage of impressive girls - from creatives, to business owners, to passionate ladies who love life and seek adventure and personal growth.  To kick off the New Year, check out this interview with Over And Out's first FAST FRIEND, dirt bike rider and female fitness boss-lady Erika Hurst. 

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Erika Hurst, 30 - Wallingford, CT   @erikahurst_  @hurststrengthct 

HOW DID YOU GET INTO RIDING?

Ever since I was a little girl I wanted a dirt bike. I thought they were the most badass things ever! But, I never got one and kind of gave up on the idea as I grew up. I ended up getting heavy into off-roading and rock crawling instead.

Then a few years ago, in the midst of a pretty low point in my life, I was seeking something to pull me out of my hole and build me back up again. So I bought my first dirt bike and I have been hooked ever since.

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WHAT TYPE OF RIDING DO YOU LIKE THE MOST? 

The first time I ever rode in the woods I HATED it. I actually ran over my own leg, and two dudes had to help me pry my boot out of my wheel well. (To this day I still have NO idea how I even managed to do that). I had whiskey throttled straight into a tree and took a handle bar through my helmet and goggles right into my face.

I had only been riding for a couple months and didn’t really have any solid skills or confidence, so it really rattled me. At the time I swore I’d never go in the woods again.

That was three years ago and somehow I keep finding myself pulled back out there and craving trail riding because I know it will not only make me a better rider skill-wise, but also when something scares the shit out of me I know I have to break through that barrier if I want to grow.

Needless to say, woods riding has definitely grown on me. Unfortunately, I don’t get to do it very often because of the strict laws in CT. So I spend most of my seat time on the track – which I love too!

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HOW DID YOU GET INTO FITNESS TRAINING? 

After high school I gained some weight and became the girl who ran on the treadmill for hours 6-7 days a week and ate as little as possible.  I thought this would make me fit, while the need for strength never occurred to me.

I started going to an automotive tech school at the time. I could barely lift a tire and I always had to ask for help breaking bolts.  It was hard enough as a woman trying to get hired as a mechanic, but adding a lack of physical capability on top of that I realized I needed to do something about that. So I slowly started spending a little more time in the weight room.

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I soaked up every bit of knowledge I could on how to get stronger. When I spent less time self-loathing about my body fat or trying to use the treadmill to burn off every calorie possible, and spent more time finding meaning in pursuing physical capability, treating myself well and eating to support my body, my life completely changed.

I realized this approach was working; I saw and felt incredible changes in my body.  And, I felt like it was my duty to share this “secret” with other women, so I switched careers and started school for exercise science and human performance. 

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TELL US ABOUT HURST STRENGTH!

I wanted to create a gym where women could go to feel empowered, badass and free of judgement. I also believe what we do in the gym should enhance our lives, make us feel badass and should be used as a vehicle towards becoming our best, most capable selves so we can do more rad things outside of the gym.

So that’s what I created with my gym, Hurst Strength. My goal is to change how women view fitness, lead them to feeling more confident in their bodies and help them embrace proper strength training. This is what I work towards doing every day. 

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I try to let my life be an example for other women and to show I practice what I preach – I don’t spend hours working out, I don’t diet or deprive myself, I continuously chase strength and improved performance so that I can live a more abundant life, and I see food as both fuel and pleasure.

Lifting has also given me the confidence to pursue other endeavors and risks that I would have never had the confidence to do otherwise. I’m constantly asking myself “can I do that?” Which has pushed me to seek out activities like dirtbiking, mountain biking and downhill riding, hiking, snowboarding, the list goes on!

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HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT FITNESS AND ITS RELATION TO RIDING?

There is absolutely no way I could have developed the skills or endurance to properly ride or handle a dirt bike if I wasn’t strong, functionally fit and didn’t have the body awareness I’ve developed from strength training.

I’d also probably still be pinned underneath my bike in the middle of a track somewhere. Haha!

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WHAT FITNESS TIPS DO YOU HAVE FOR FEMALE RIDERS?

1. Don’t shy away from weights. Women are often convinced they shouldn’t lift weights or should do “toning” exercises with light weight. But a combo of heavy weight and low reps (1-5X) plus moderate weight with slightly higher reps (6-12X) is the most effective.

2.  Focus on making the majority of your training program basic compound movements (exercises that recruit multiple muscles at once and carry over to movements we do in real life) Think moves like squats, deadlifts, presses, rows and single leg exercises that build functional core strength.

3. Focus on core strength.  Our core needs to be strong and stable enough to prevent unnecessary movement in our midsection.  So core training should consist of movements that involve trying to maintain a “neutral” spine under a load or force that is trying to alter that position.

For example, doing a plank where you have to work to resist gravity VS. a crunch where you’re doing a whole lot of unhealthy bending through your spine. Crunches and other typical ab exercises don’t truly train functional core strength that will help protect against injury and prevent lower backaches while riding. Even despite the “burn” you feel.

A common injury in motocross is lumbar trauma from repeated impacts while riding in a flexed (rounded) position. So this rounded posture isn’t something we want to continue training in the gym by doing crunches and sit-ups. It’s best to strengthen the opposite position.

4. Put an emphasis on upper back strength (lots of rows and chin up variations) and grip strength (I love farmer’s carries or simply hanging from a pull up bar, but rowing exercises and deadlifts build a strong grip too.

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WHAT'S YOUR FAVORITE THING ABOUT RIDING? 

Seeing how big of a dirt-stache I have when I take my helmet off, haha!

But seriously, I love the rush, the feeling of accomplishment when you tackle an obstacle or develop a skill you’ve been working on, and the high of finishing a ride with all of your limbs still intact. :P

Riding has become SO much more to me. It’s helped me become infinitely more courageous, resilient and vulnerable. It’s also an awesome ego check! It’s taught me so much about myself. 

WHAT'S YOUR SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT PIECE OF ADVICE FOR GIRLS GETTING INTO RIDING?

Get strong...and then get stronger! Seriously!

 

@erikahurst @hurststrengthct @overandoutmoto Photos by @s_tribby #fastfriends